Race Recap: Rock n Roll Philadelphia Remix Challenge 2017

When I first started running Rock n Roll races, I remember seeing the Hall of Fame status set at 10 races. I remember wondering to myself how someone could have the stamina and the means to accomplish 10 half marathons, let alone find the time to travel to different races around the country or the world within one calendar year.

Well, 6 years later, my time had finally come.

I had sandwiched this trip in between a few other work commitments, as I have done with most of my other runs. I had arrived in the dead of night into Philadelphia like I had for Chicago a few months prior, getting dropped off by a very kind Lyft driver. I stayed a few short blocks away from the start line at an AirBnb and made myself boxed mac and cheese on both nights, preferring to keep things low key and frugal. This pretty much sums up my journey to ten Rock n Roll races, and then some…

With only a few hours of sleep, I showed up to the 5K start line to pick up my bib and other goodies. The air was heavy with humidity. It wasn’t warm, nor was it cool. It just…was.

The 5K was an out and back. It was simple, fairly sunny, with plenty of walkers and runners and cheery faces.

After the 5K, I headed back to my AirBnB to grab a few winks of sleep before heading out to the convention center for my half marathon bib and to wander the city. It was fairly easy to get around town using the bus and on foot. The day heated up a bit, and when coupled with the humidity, made me feel like a cased sausage. I must be getting used to the dry weather in Denver.

I started noticing that they’ve completely given up on customizing the shirts for each city, so I’ve made it a point to hit the Toyota booth at each expo to get the arm badge affixed. So far I’ve made things like “I run for pie” and “I run for fries” and other silly things. Maybe in LA I can make “I run for hot pot.”

When I was done with expo things, I went to check out some historical things, like the Liberty Bell. It was a lot smaller in person. How come the Liberty Bell in history books made it look so much bigger?

Most of Independence Hall was closed by the time I got there, and tickets were required, so I snapped some photos and walked around. Hopefully next time I can plan ahead.

I noticed Chinatown and popped by for some yummy food. I hadn’t really had breakfast and it was nearly the late afternoon…time for lunch!

I stopped into a poke restaurant for a quick healthy bite to eat. Very yummy!

Afterwards, I met up with a girlfriend at the Edgar Allen Poe historical museum.

There were too many places to eat, and so many places to see. I really do have to come back another year to enjoy everything!

 

The next day, I set out for the half marathon. It was one of the most beautiful race starts I’ve seen, to be honest! Also, by the time my corral started, the pros had already completed their 5K lap. Just…wow!

I think this was the race’s 40th anniversary. From what I found it boasted 29 legacy runners. I can’t imagine doing something for 40 years straight, except for eating, breathing, and sleeping, but only because those are automatic and required for life.

This shot reminded me of running through Liverpool!

My namesake?

This was in the Fairmount neighborhood, which was really close to my Airbnb.

This was one of the prisons, which was guarded by gargoyles. There’s tours daily, but I didn’t get a chance to go. Next time!

Lucky number seven!

Perhaps I wasn’t at work, but later that day I’d have to board a plane to Seattle to head to work.

At this point I was at mile 9 and I would’ve preferred the couch, to be honest.

This rocker dude greets me at almost every race.

There were a lot of cyclists bandit-ing the course, which was annoying. However, this guy was wearing an Incredibles costume and riding along the racers cheering us on.

I was more than thrilled when I saw the finish line. Never happier! Really though, I was never happier because I had reflected on my 10-race journey during this race. It’s been awhile since I’ve been emotional during a race, but this was a special one for me. So many times during this year I had felt like throwing in the towel on this goal, but here I was. I’m only 2/3 of the way there, but this still feels like a good accomplishment to me.

Here I am, with my gold record for race #10 of the year!

My friend and I even ran up the Rocky steps!

Winner winner chicken dinner!

Here’s the results and map of my race:

From there, I hopped on a plane to work…

I added a few more medals to my collection, including a remix medal. So much bling!

Next stop: Disneyland Paris!

Race Recap: Rock n Roll Virginia Beach Half Marathon 2017

Soooo…Virginia Beach. That was an interesting trip!

We cashed in all of our miles to book this birthday trip for Erik, which fell during Labor Day weekend and during the Great American Music Festival. To keep things affordable, we flew into Washington DC and decided to drive to Virginia Beach.

A road trip would be fun! We love road trips! However, this was a road trip like no other. A 3:30 drive quickly turned into a 5 hour trip, and it being on the heels of a red eye made it even harder on the driver (him). We napped at a rest stop along the way to make things a little easier.

Then, on top of that, our Airbnb was pretty awful, so we had to book a new hotel at the last minute. Our race weekend was off to a pretty rocky start.

We got to the expo though and did our usual rounds – photos and bib pickup. I even got to sign the wall this time, and got my race shirt personalized!

After securing a place to rest for the night that wasn’t terrible, we prepped our stuff and relaxed. The air was heavy, warm, and dewy. It felt like we were swimming where ever we walked. It was weird, almost like Nashville, except without the heat.

The next morning, we headed to the race start. Thanks to our hotel, it was a quick 15 minute walk. That was probably one of the closest hotels I’ve ever stayed at…with exception of the one at Rock n Roll Vegas in 2013 probably, when I stayed on the same block as the finish line. That was just dreamy. I seeded myself in the back corral, since my training in August was completely off. I think I completed a handful of runs, but definitely no triathlon training. I felt a bit unconditioned than usual, so I figured I’d hang out with the cool kids.

Most of the corrals were pretty low energy. It seemed like the even the emcee was having a hard time getting them pumped up, and she is always super enthusiastic and every single race! When it came time for us, at least we got into the rock ‘n roll spirit.

Apparently the slower folks save their energy for the party?

Anyhow, the race conditions were miserable, so I didn’t take any photos. The mugginess always bother me, that and headwind, so my phone didn’t make it out of my hydration pack. I’ve been sticking to my handheld water bottle lately, and the phone barely fits inside of it. Taking it out is more trouble than it’s worth, and the route wasn’t too scenic towards the end anyways.

The course itself was fairly flat. As I was finishing up my second mile or so, the winners of the race were finishing up. I saw the first, second, and third place men and women. Pretty cool. It reminded me of Liverpool! I kept going and the environment changed quite a bit, going from beachfront to a lush forest. We ran through a residential area, and then around an army base, back up a bridge, and then along the waterfront for a pier finish. The sun came out and I didn’t put on a lot of sunscreen in the morning, so I decided to gun it towards the end and run the last 2-3 miles continuously (as opposed to sticking with my run/walk intervals). I just wanted to get out of the sun so that I didn’t burn!

I ended up finishing my ninth race with three medals: the half marathon medal, the 9th challenge medal, and the Beach to Beach medal (San Diego and Virginia Beach medal). Sweet race bling!

After a disco nap, we headed back out for some pizza and the music festival on the beach.

And then, we were back off to Denver.

Since this was my 9th Rock n Roll race this year, this also means that I have 6 more to go: 10) Philadelphia 11) San Jose 12) Los Angeles 13) Denver 14) Savannah or San Antonio 15) Las Vegas.

Next stop…Disneyland Paris!

Race Recap: Rock n Roll Chicago Half Marathon 2017

My eighth Rock n Roll race of the year was in Chicago. What an adventure that was! This was the quickest turnaround trip I think I’ve ever done for an out-of-state race. I had a class the morning before my trip that kept me on my toes. After my class was over.¬†It required a bit more preparation than usual to pull off…

1) My pasta dinner needed to be pre-cooked and pre-packed
2) I packed 24-hours worth of food and toiletries in a single carry-on (I love it!)
3) My signed race release was in my handheld hydration pack for the race
4) My flight clothes were packed in my school bag
5) My race clothes doubled as my pajamas

My class was out at 4pm, and my flight was set to leave by 6:10. Boarding was at 5:45pm, but after many many delays we ended up departing at 10pm!

I was so tired. I ate an extra round of airport linner (that’s what I call lunch and dinner). I enjoyed my pasta on the plane, and landed in Chicago at around 1:30am. I was exhausted and decided against picking up my rental car, especially since I slept so little the night before. After calling a Lyft, I finally made it to my Airbnb by 2:30. I prepped my race gear and was asleep by 2:45.

My alarm went off at 5:30am. I had only had a few moments to wake up, get dressed, and head out. Most of my journeys to the start line are fairly uneventful. However, this one truly takes the cake…

What I should’ve done was taken the train…it would’ve taken me pretty close to the start line without much fuss. What I ended up doing was calling a Lyft driver. Most of the time, Lyft drivers are pretty awesome and they take directions pretty well. This one completely refused to take directions from me, or from Google Maps. He insisted on using his in-dash Tom Tom, which doesn’t live update traffic conditions based on road closures. He kept talking down to me for the entire ride, even though I told him that I was in a rush, and that he should just take directions from Google Maps. He also kept ignoring road closures and the police had to intervene. It was a mess.

I was in a rush because I had only 20 minutes to get to the start, and to pick up my bib. Again, this was a start like no other because I was picking up my bib at the solutions tent. It’s unlike me to grab my bib the morning of the race. It’s certainly hectic, but I didn’t anticipate getting in so late, nor did I anticipate such a terrible driver. He kept driving farther and farther from the start line, and at the earliest opportunity I had, I got out of the car and began running to the start! I’ve never done that before, but I absolutely had to do what needed to be done to get my bib. It was about 1.5 miles to the start. I made it in the nick of time. Quite literally, I showed up as the first wave was taking off! By the time I got my bib, the first five waves had left. I was able to pin on my bib and hop into my corral. A few minutes later, I was at the start line.

Once we were off, the runners went winding through the streets of Chicago. I know I say this every time, but this was definitely one of the best courses on the race circuit! It was a completely flat, urban course. I loved being downtown and winding through the urban attractions. I’d been there once before, for Erik’s birthday a few years ago, so I recognized some of the buildings.

Some of my things I noticed about running through Chicago: lots of Dunkin Donuts, lots of theaters (like, plays…not cinemas), plentiful public transit, tons of event venues, and plenty of places to eat! If I had more time, I would love to take an eating tour of the city. ūüôā

I finished with a lackluster time, which was fine, given 2.5 hours of sleep…

I was tired, but not exhausted. I followed my :40/:40 intervals, kept well hydrated despite the humidity, and slowed down whenever I needed to. I earned my bean!

We ran right past Buckingham Fountain, so I went back for a quick photo before I left to shower and fly out of the city…thus concluding my less-than 12-hour journey in Chicago.

This was a difficult trip in many ways. Even though it all worked out, the logistics cut quite close on all accounts. I’m not sure what I could’ve done differently except…well, everything. This being race 8 of 15 was really stressful. I suppose it would be in good practice to have such a disaster of a weekend occur halfway through a 15-race challenge!

The rest of the year needs to be booked pretty tightly for me to get to the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame goal of 15 races. I have Virginia Beach, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Jose, and Denver all logistically figured out. The only ones that are left to figure out are Savannah and Philadelphia.

Although I try not to think too far ahead, I’m thinking to my 2018 goals as well. What will be my triathlon goal for next year? I’m still twiddling my thumbs and considering my options, but I’ve already began merging my running training plan with a triathlon training plan.

Race Recap: Rock n Roll Seattle Remix Challenge 2017

For the eighth city of the year I headed back to my favorite race city, Seattle! Seeing as though my office is based out of Seattle (well, sort of), I mixed work and fun. I flew in to the city and headed in to the office for some meetings, and then at the end of the day headed out to the expo to pick up my bibs for the weekend. After lots of consternation I picked up my half marathon bib, rather than a full marathon…even though I would continue to ruminate over it the entire weekend. Ugh.

The inaugural Rock n Roll Seattle 5K started and finished at the Museum of Flight. Running along Marginal Way, the views of the airplanes were fantastic. We even had impromptu corral waves that corresponded with airplane takeoffs! ¬†Since Alaska Airlines was the sponsor, they even had a small little plane arch. Look at the cute little plane! It’s so little!

Since Erik had a shakeout run before his marathon, he did the unthinkable…he jogged the 5K with me, side by side. It was really nice starting and finishing a race with him. I’ve always wanted to do that!

The 5K field was much smaller than I thought it would be, given the lead time and the popularity of running in the city of Seattle. Since we ran the first one, I suppose this sets us up to be legacy runners for this race. I suppose that’s something I’d be okay with.

The 5K run was a very flat course. It was north on Marginal Way from the Museum of Flight, 1.5 miles from the start, with a turnaround and back. We ran on both lanes of the street since they were completely shut down. There was definitely a band and a water station along this route…much better than Liverpool!

After the race, we ran a few errands before heading back to the Museum of Flight.

The finish line was celebratory as expected. Lots of families and charity runners finished alongside one another, and lots of folks headed in to the museum. I thought that it was a fantastic venue for the race. I really look forward to doing it again next year.

After a day of running around, we settled in to an evening of spaghetti dinner at our Airbnb and rested up for our big day.

On Sunday morning, I woke up and got ready for my half marathon. I woke up still fairly tired from the marathon — something that felt pretty familiar from the week, to be honest — and I was glad that many people talked me out of running the full marathon. We walked over to Husky Stadium, which was the start of the new race course. It was a really nice race morning, not too cool but definitely a bit more humid than I remembered for Seattle.

Seattle tends to be a fairly popular race, and since the half and full begin together, the corrals end up blending together. After they called a dozen or so, I finally got to begin my race!

This new course was really interesting. I thought I would like it more, to be honest. So many of the miles wind through my old race stomping grounds. The first 1/10th of a mile runs on the Montlake Bridge, which was an absolute pain. Having to run on the bridge meant that we had to run on the medal grading, which was really difficult and potentially hazardous if you run clumsily like I do.

From there, the course winds through neighborhoods that I’ve ridden through during my triathlon training days. As I dripped from the humidity, I notice that the course comes up along the Kurt Cobain bench:

As the race progresses along the Lake Washington waterfront, it’s difficult to miss the Seattle skyline. The clouds were hanging fairly low that morning, but I still find it beautiful nonetheless.

While running on the course, I kept running and catching up to the guy dressed up as an airplane. I wondered if he was someone who particularly loved Alaskan Airlines? Or maybe he worked for them and really loved the company?

The costume was awesome, but he looked pretty warm while running. He also looked tired because he was hauling the thing around the entire time. I would run into him again and again on the course though, so he kept a fairly good pace given the costume! I hope to be able to run with such an awesome costume someday. ūüôā

My legs were feeling particularly fatigued, especially by mile 9. The marathon in San Diego really did a number on me. Even now I still don’t feel like I’ve quite recovered yet. At this point we’re about a mile past the marathon/half marathon split. This sign was here to remind me that my bling was around the corner. Just a few more miles left to go.

We’re winding our way through Rainier Valley. It’s not a very nice part of Rainier Valley, but a few years ago I was part of a painting project that met in a secret warehouse to paint portraits over the weekend. I remembered some of the side streets. I thought a lot about those times of my life, these streets, and how far I had come. I never thought that I’d leave Seattle, let alone live in Denver, yet here I was. After a few miles, we turned the corner in the International District and I could see Century Link stadium.

The finish chute narrowed as the marathoners joined us back near the finish line. By the time I finished I was completely drenched and exhausted. It reminded me of how I felt after finishing Nashville, except it wasn’t hot.

After some stretching and changing, I went back for my other medals and then headed back to the finish line to enjoy the festivities.

I’m now on race 7 towards 15 to my Hall of Fame status this year. I really need to focus on taking care of my body, stretching, strength training, getting massages, and not overextending my training.

My next stop…24 hours, start to finish, in Chicago!

 

Race Recap: Rock n Roll San Diego Remix Challenge 2017

While in Liverpool, I peeked at the race calendar for the Rock n Roll series. I knew that there was a marathon in San Diego the weekend we returned from our trip, and that it was the only 7-hour finish cutoff until the end of the year (others being Savannah or San Antonio). I was pretty bummed that I couldn’t get a finishers jacket from San Antonio since I planned on being at the Cal International Marathon for my husband’s big BQ effort that weekend, so this was a neat opportunity. That, and on our trip we met a nice gal that also lived in San Diego who was also running it, and she was a 2-time Hall of Fame’r! How amazing is that?

I flew in to Denver from Liverpool in the evening on Thursday and was back out again to San Diego on Friday. I enjoyed sleeping in my bed for a few hours before hopping back out on the plane. Sun-drenched San Diego greeted me with open arms and I hurried over to the expo, mainly so that I could quickly get back to a coffee shop somewhere to get some work done. Armed with two race bibs, the weekend was off to a good start.

My plan for the 5K was just to have fun and to warm up. I had not ran for a week — since the race in Liverpool — so this was really meant to just shake things out. Overall things were pretty humid, but not hot, which was a really nice change from all of the weather issues I’ve been encountering.

After the race, we caught up with my bestie for brunch, and headed to the expo to grab some last minute supplies.

For the rest of the day, I ate and relaxed and got my race gear ready for the big 26.2. It would be my fifth!

My plan was to do my best, but mostly to finish the marathon under the 7-hour cutoff. It was a major concern because my longest training run was on April 15th or so, which was almost 6 weeks prior. I had learned too late that Seattle had a 6-hour cutoff, so I quit training for the full distance and began focusing on the half distance. Now is the time I would put the adage to the test…is it truly better to show up at the race¬†slightly undertrained? Between being slightly undertrained, at having my sleep cycles on and off because of the time change, I had a pretty hefty base so perhaps I would be okay. I would do my best, sticking to my race intervals that I learned from the WDW marathon. Instead of 30-second run-walk intervals, I increased it to 45-second run-walk intervals. My plan also included running through the intervals on the downhills as safely as possible, trotting the uphills if my intervals called for it, and keeping my intervals on flats no matter what.

Thanks to the jetlag and a big bowl of pasta, I was asleep pretty early and got an amazing nights sleep. I awoke at 4am feeling pretty good and headed over to the race start.

I was super excited — this being my very first Rock n Roll full marathon, I was excited to see how different it would be. The big box races seem to bring their own flare to the marathon distance. The bands were placed towards the harder points of the race after the half distance. The motivational banners and posters more helpful. The cheer stations a bit more enthusiastic where needed. I did see some of the water stations being packed up, which is slightly demotivating, but I kept going.

The first portion of the race is always a party, because that’s where the bulk of the racers are I suppose. The photo stops are great.

Some people wonder if you can still run a race for time if you stop for pictures? I personally don’t see why not. It’s your race after all. What was cute was that I even saw a TARDIS, which was like a throwback to my last racecation!

I eventually came up on the half/full split. I’ve seen this in other races where I’ve split off to the half marathon route, and I’ve always wanted to be on the marathon end. This was finally my year. At the 8 mile mark, I still felt good, so I went with it.

After making my way on the marathon route, the party got noticeably more quiet. However, I started noticing that restaurants and coffee shops were opening. People were inside, rubbing the sleep out of their eyes. The scent of cinnamon buns were filling the air. It was very unfair.

I made my way down to the freeway. I’ve always wanted to take a selfie pic next to the freeway without getting mistaken for a hoodlum! Now I get to take a selfie and THEN run on the freeway. A cyclist tried to come down the freeway with us and a cop stopped them. I suppose it seemed like a faster way to get around that day so I don’t blame them.

So, running on the freeway seems like it would be a faster way to get around during a race. NOT SO. Freeways are graded so that cars can zip up and down those curves quickly, but not humans. So when humans like myself try to slowly run up and down those curves, we do it slowly and at an angle. My ankles went crunch, crunch, crunch, of which my massage therapist and my chiro (later today) will be working out.

I ran through neighborhoods, both real and imagined. Okay, well, “imagined.”

Apparently insurance companies can also set up drinking bars along marathon routes, which is interesting. In most cases they would probably deter things like that.

At the halfway mark I took a screenshot of Runkeeper to save my time – I wanted to have this as a benchmark from my past half marathons to see my pacing and how I was doing. It would be nice if Runkeeper had a lap timer button, or a view that allowed me to see “if she kept going at this pace she will finish a 26.2 in XXXXXX or a 50K in XXXXXX.” Maybe I can put in a feature request?

After this mark I pretty much put my phone away and went to work. It’s where the race began getting difficult. If I were to get truly honest, the race really got difficult somewhere between 18 and 21…sometime around Sea World and getting back on the freeway. I was hurting but not as bad as I thought I would be. I didn’t think I could’ve pushed any harder, but maybe in hindsight I had a little more in me? Probably not. My toes, neck, and back are still recovering and it’s been a few days.

I can rarely muster a smile at mile 25, so I decided to give it a try. It worked, sort of. I kept going. Notice the lack of parallel lines everywhere! My ankles are super angry at me.

I ran through mile 25-26.2. As I whizzed past the 26th mile marker I snapped this because I couldn’t bother stopping for it. I had a PR I was gunning for!

After the finish, I was elated. My finish time was 6:17:02.

I had beat my 6-year old marathon PR by 6 minutes 23 seconds.

I beat my last marathon time (WDW in January, 6 months old) by 18 minutes 10 seconds.

I worked for it, and I’m thankful for that little raspberry watch on my right wrist that helped get me there.

I’m also very thankful for the support of my husband, Erik, and my new friend Arlene, who both peer pressured me into taking on the race and the 7-hour time limit, even though I thought I’d be cutting it a bit too close. For once, peer pressure for good!

All in all, a happy ending. I know that knocking off this much time off of consecutive races is really hard. My goal time for Rock n Roll Arizona is 5:40, which is pretty much another 40 minutes off my now best time. It’ll be a lot of work, but let’s see if I can’t do it again. I have 6 months to focus on nutrition, sleep, and to be more mindful of my speed training, so we shall see!

Race Recap: Rock n Roll Liverpool 2017 Remix Challenge

 

After much anticipation, we touched down in Manchester for a quick afternoon, wandered the city for a bit, and then boarded a train to Liverpool the next morning. Despite the tragedy that struck just a day or so earlier, we found a lot of love and beauty in the city:

The next morning, we boarded a train to Liverpool. We made it to the expo after enjoying the scenic route. The costumes at this expo were much more exciting than others, because obviously THE BEATLES:

I mean, seriously, why do I even run if this coat is going to make me look fat?

Maybe the glasses will distract you!

So, I signed up for the remix challenge, which includes two days of running, a 5K and a half marathon. It seemed like a good idea at the time. I’ve been working on my speed a bit, so I thought that it’d be¬†a good idea to use the 5K as a fitness test.

Well, things did not go quite as planned for the 5K. They mostly did, but I was really thirsty!

I looked at the map but failed to look for water stations. I assumed there would be some, but none were supplied. I didn’t drink much fluids beforehand after waking up because I had caught a cold upon landing in Manchester. I started the race thirsty, and with a PR in mind I was pretty much dying about a quarter mile in. I kept going and crossed the finish line with my second best 5K time (32:01), albeit 6 years behind my PR (27:11 in 2011). I was pretty much over the moon. I wonder if I could’ve done better if I had water, a better corral, and a lack of head cold. Should I try a smaller race? Maybe practice a few time trials on the track next door? Until then I’ll take my second best 5K time.

The finish line was strobe light-tastic inside the arena, complete with a fog machine and loud music. It was also insanely hot, and for anyone who put forth a race effort, I’m sure it felt like someone wrapped a hot, heavy, humid victory blanket around them. Afterwards, we headed to a local eatery, the Brunswick Brunch Cafe, for breakfast. It was so good!

The second day, we lined up for the big race. In my case it was the half marathon, and in Erik’s case it was his full marathon.

My last half was in Nashville, which was fairly disastrous, given the weather circumstances. I had peeked at the course map and heard a bit about the quirky way they managed hydration on this course, so I wasn’t too worried. Again, I got it allllllll wrong. There was headwind from every direction, even for some reason when we were running in between buildings.

This race boasted almost 50 bands along the course, and because of this I didn’t run with earphones. They certainly didn’t disappoint! I remember a fair amount of them being cover bands, or at least playing covers of The Beatles. The crowd support was also amazing, especially in the park and in the city.¬†There were lots of community love, which was great.

The last three or four miles of the race was brick-laid waterfront boardwalk, which was very difficult to run on. At every electrolyte station, they were all out of Gatorade (or their European equivalent). They hand out full bottles over there, and most people took a few sips and then tossed them on the floor. I was so thirsty that I eyed the mostly full bottles, but then ignored them and continued on my way. I was already really sick with a pretty bad cold. How much worse could it get, right?

I slogged through as best as I could and made it to the finish line, excited to collect my medals and my grub. I was pretty sore and tired, almost along the lines of Nashville in absence of the heat, which I thought was really uncharacteristic. I did have a cold and technically I was dealing with a time zone difference too. Maybe the next time I try to PR, I try to do it in my home country or I spend more time adjusting my sleep or not getting sick. ūüôā

I finally got my first remix medal and I’m in love with them. How awesome are they?! They are a bit larger than I thought they would be, but still really nice. I can’t wait to collect more in Seattle, Virginia Beach, San Jose, Denver, and Savannah.

Overall, it was a significant amount of swag and bling for 16.2 miles of running.

Here are some videos from the weekend in general. A race shout-out from our tour guide, the day before the race:

One of the bands along the course:

A few minutes later, I passed the runners who just started the full marathon. Why they had a 1-hour later start than us completely confused me:

Erik’s glorious finish:

I’d love to come back and run this course again. With a little more preparation I think I could do a lot better and also see more of the sights of Liverpool before and after the race!

Race Recap: Rock n Roll Nashville 2017

It’s been a month since my last race. I’ve been really enjoying the downtime at home on weekends. However, I’ve spent some time really thinking about my running goals before hitting the road. Before I knew it, we were headed to Nashville.

 

As always, I was following the weather pretty closely leading up to the race. Turns out that the heat would be absolutely no joke. The weather was pegged somewhere in the 90s during the weekend. Race day was sandwiched with thunderstorms. I went back and forth with race outfits and at 4am, before leaving the apartment, I made one last switch to something much thinner, just in case. It turned out to be a great decision. I also packed two pairs of running shoes (one waterproof), and a windbreaker, just in case I got rained on.

The warmest race I’d ever ran was my “warm up” marathon for Dopey in December. I put it in quotes because it was ironically warm — Dallas, in the winter, was unseasonably humid and warm. The following day it was below freezing, because Erik ran his marathon that day and I kept swapping out his frozen water bottles. I remember it vividly. My times suffered horribly because of the heat.The Texas Double was fairly intense, but this was WAY WORSE. I never thought I would pass out in Dallas, but I certainly felt that way in Nashville. The weather was bad enough for a heat advisory at the expo.¬†I snapped this lovely gem the day before:

I ended up thinking a lot about that sign as I slowwwwly walked the hilly, humid, steamy course. I didn’t commit any of it to memory of course. I read something about salt pills, but I’ve never taken them and I try not to try anything new on race day…although I’m sure this was an exception. (Perhaps I should’ve aimed for some salty french fries or something instead?)

The morning of the race was absolutely miserable. We climbed into the car and it was probably already in the high 70s and humid. Getting to the start was also pretty challenging. It was probably the most congested race start I’ve ever been to, on par with the West Hollywood Halloween block party I’d say. It was about five or six blocks of human sardines pushing against one another, in their full hot sweaty glory, on top of the humidity. After I parted ways with my party, I quickly ducked into a Holiday Inn to use the restroom and to cool off until my race corral was near the start.

I was drenched in sweat even before the race began. By the time the race started, I felt like I was in a sauna. I wondered if this was how Ironman Louisville would’ve felt like, because I’m pretty sure it would’ve felt like this. The start line was still fairly enthusiastic and energetic. I felt cranky but alas I was here.

The course itself was pretty hilly and had winding roads. The first aid station ran out of water. Thankfully I was carrying my Camelbak so water wasn’t much of an issue for me. I stayed away from courtesy water sprays, mostly because I didn’t have any extra sunscreen to reapply and I was more scared of getting burnt to a crisp. I drank lots and lots AND LOTS of gatorade, and for the first time in a long time I dropped a few nuun tabs into my Camelbak. I’ve literally never been so hot, like, ever. I felt like dropping out after the first four miles and I quit consistent intervals after about three minutes, and quit them altogether after 2 miles. My splits were positive. I really just wanted it all over, and I was really sore because it’s been awhile since I’d walked this distance. I’ve been running the distance, so my body was not prepared for the time on my feet and certainly not the heat…

Here’s how miserable I looked (and felt!).

I was in the shade, so apparently I wasn’t too cranky yet. You should get a load of me at the finish line though:

I’m pretty much burning up. I didn’t even bother to take a finish line selfie. I’m mostly just too angry and thirsty and hot to stop. I just want to grab all the goodies and find somewhere to sit. Unfortunately it would be about another 20 minutes or so until I got to sit, because I’d still have to walk to the other end of the stadium to the car.

It’s a few days later and I’m pretty sure I’m still dehydrated and tired from the race! I’ve been drinking more than usual and trying to rest but I’m still feeling pretty beat. After the race we mustered as much energy as we could to visit the Music Hall of Fame Museum. It was a lot of fun.

We got home in time to greet our monthly subscribe and save package, that includes all of our training goodies which includes a healthy shipment of training gels and nuun. I stash my Kona Cola nuun away for emergencies.

We’ve been slowly but surely adding to our medals. Our first heavy medal came in today as well! I’m really looking forward to our other ones. A lot of them will come in the mail during the summer.

The next few weeks should be interesting. Classes are wrapping up, and our next race will be overseas. See you in Liverpool!

Race Recap: Rock n Roll San Francisco Half Marathon 2017

Stop #3: Sam Clams Disco!

I can’t believe I hadn’t done this race sooner. What took me so long to do a race in northern California? I’ve gone up the coast for plenty of work trips, but very rarely for fun trips.¬†Such a travesty…I’ve seen so much under the guise of work, but this was the one trip where it all came together nicely.

We escaped the blizzard (again) and caught up with some friends, old and new. After packet pickup, I met with a friend that I hadn’t seen in years. In fact, the last time I sat in the same room with him I had just started running and had registered for the Athens Classic Marathon. He was incredibly supportive of my running endeavors. (Yes, it’d been¬†that long!) We then met up with another very close friend who just relocated there from Seattle and enjoyed a day around the city before resting our legs for the big race.

We lucked out the morning of the race. We were staying with a friend who was also a runner, and he was kind enough to drive us to the start line. This particular race was much smaller than the other Rock n Roll races I’ve done in the past. It also started much earlier, at 6:15am, which I assume is because of the road closures and potential impact on the city.

There were few bands on the early part of the course until almost the end. It didn’t get too interesting until after the Golden Gate bridge, which meant we were out of the residential areas. It made complete sense since the race started so early anyways. However, the course itself was very¬†scenic, so it made up for the lack of bands.¬†I also noticed that there were parts of the course at the beginning and the end where the course would split and merge, probably because I’m a back of packer and due to the race cutoff times.

My favorite part of the race was definitely the Golden Gate bridge, the weather, and the views of the coast. I enjoyed running into the city and all the sightseeing we did afterwards. It was a nice change of pace. My favorite part was posing with our finisher medals in front of the cable car turnaround!

Overall, it was great seeing my friends again, and seeing a familiar city in a new light. I’m really looking forward to our next race…Nashville!

Race Recap: 2017 Rock n Roll DC Half Marathon

This was my first new race destination in quite awhile! It was¬†nice escaping Denver for a long weekend in the nation’s capital. (Well, it was part exciting and part depressing all at the same time, given the political climate…)

Before heading out of town, I enjoyed some birthday cake and rang in my 33rd year with my friends, students, and co-workers. It was significantly more quiet than years past when I threw parties. Maybe I’ll get there again soon but 32 seemed to have hit me upside the head so quickly and 33 came screaming by that I had no clue that it was even around the corner until the week before.

My besties flew into town for the weekend before, which was great. As I packed for my trip to DC, I paired my newly gifted Sparkle Skirt with a bright idea: Why not (try to) run as Lady Liberty? I threw some pieces together, made a torch, and voila!

I took the Friday off of work and we flew in. It was fairly chilly, as the weather reports and folks on social media reported. I packed layers and layers and layers, and thankfully it was more than enough to keep me warm. However, we picked up some hand warmers and foot warmers just in case.

The race expo was just down the street from our AirBNB, and was a stone’s throw from the metro line. Such a great location!

The race itself was quite beautiful and scenic. The first few miles of the course ran around several monuments and I stopped for photos along the way. I was surprised that more people didn’t stop. Perhaps they were all locals. This was definitely not a race for time!

There was one giant hill somewhere around mile 5 or 6. It was dedicated to one of the charities of the race, and was dedicated to veterans. As touching as it was, the hill was certainly difficult! They even had sandwich boards of all the photos and names of the veterans they were honoring, along with volunteers or service men/women who were there honoring their peers. It was quite touching. Because I was so tired of the hill I didn’t snap any photos, so you’ll just have to take my word for it.

This race was a bit more emotional for me than anticipated. I thought a lot about how long it took for me to come out to DC on my own, and what a shame it was that I had come out at such a tumultuous time. We skipped a race a month before due to a death in the family, and I thought a lot about that and what it meant to my husband. I thought a lot about my own family during this run too, since the last time I had been in DC was with my parents and my brother. I thought about the time I was in the USCG and wondered how all of my peers were faring. I thought about how life was drastically different compared to my middle school self, my high school graduate self, and my current self, and how all of those expectations were also completely different. I thought a lot about the privileges I’ve had (and lacked) in growing up in the places I have.

I used to think that I didn’t have to think about what was going on in Washington DC. I used to think that outsourcing those “big decisions” to others would be more than sufficient. It seems to be abundantly clear that if you expect something to be done right, that you actually have to keep your eye(s) on it and to consistently audit its progress. You’ll also have to make your voice heard in all the ways that you can. If you don’t think you have to care much about politics or if you don’t think it’ll have much of an effect on your everyday life, then you must be living a pretty privileged life.

As you can see, I did a lot of thinking overall over the course of 13.1 miles. It was probably because I stopped for so many photos…

It was definitely one of my favorite courses. I definitely plan on returning again to DC. Hopefully it’ll be a bit more joyous in the future and I’ll get a chance to do more sightseeing. We stayed a few days to enjoy the National Air and Space Museum. Next time I’d like to see some of the other museums and make more time to visit the monuments during the daytime, and perhaps have a more productive trip.

Finish line selfie!

Very special thanks to Jill Corral for her generous donation to my Planned Parenthood fundraiser!

Next stop: San Francisco!!

10 Races for Planned Parenthood! on Crowdrise

Race Recap: 2017 Rock n Roll Arizona Half Marathon

We flew into Phoenix¬†for our cool-down race, just a mere 3 days after returning from Orlando. By the time we got home, we didn’t bother unpacking at all – in fact, while packing up in Orlando, we decided to pack for Phoenix since we were doing laundry anyways. What has become of my life?

I’ve finally hit elite status for Frontier Airlines, which means that I’m flying like a normal human being, except I’m paying Frontier Airlines prices. It’s awesome. I’ve grown accustomed to packing light anyways, but with all of the race and work traveling I’ll be doing, it’s nice to be able to have a small gym bag with me.

The nice thing about racing in Phoenix was the flat course, and of course, In-N-Out. The last time I had it was in Dallas (only a few months ago), but I decided to load up on it since it would be a long while until I was able to have it again.

We didn’t plan on buying much at the expo, but alas, it turned out that we needed more than anticipated. I was going to the Women’s March the following week and would need some supplies, and Erik needed something for his knee. We picked up a few items and high-tailed it out of there before we could do too much damage to our wallets. I had ordered a Timex watch on Amazon to arrive via locker nearby so that I could run via Galloway intervals, just to see if I could keep up my momentum from the Disney World Marathon.

The race itself went smoothly, and the intervals worked quite well. Training at elevation has really worked to my advantage, and those intervals are really a secret weapon, aren’t they?

I definitely performed better than expected. Being in Phoenix again reminded me a lot of my last race there. The last time I traveled there, I had learned of my friend’s passing and I PR’d because I was so upset at what had happened. I had also come off of a month of HIIT training. I guess it’s hard to pinpoint exactly what changed. Nonetheless, here is my change between my last formal (aka timed) half marathon:

10 minutes and 27¬†seconds. I’ll take it. It’s too bad that I can’t just double it for my marathon time, huh? Mile 13-26 is nothing like mile 0-13.

Nonetheless, it was a scenic route and I was really happy about my performance. I thought a lot about the races I had ahead of me and was excited about the upcoming year. I¬†was fairly optimistic at what the year¬†would bring. The last few weeks have definitely been difficult, and it’s taken a bit of effort for me to come around to even writing this recap entry. It almost seems silly, since this seems so unimportant compared to all of the other things that are going on. I do recognize that there must be some things that must remain constant in my life, though.

15 races around the US (and with one abroad) is no joke I suppose, so that is something worth looking forward to. It’s a privilege really, something that not everyone is in a position to afford or complete. I remember hearing about this challenge just a few years ago when I first moved to Seattle and thinking that it was crazy and so far out of reach…and now, here I am, doing it alongside Erik.

Despite our recent hardships with our families, we still have it pretty good. It’s been difficult getting myself out of the house to do the smallest tasks, but I know there’s a lot of people who depend on me, so nevertheless I do what every other woman before me has done…I get up and I do the things I’m supposed to do to the best of my ability, even if I don’t necessarily feel like it that day. And then¬†I go to sleep hoping that the next day things are a little better.