Dopey Challenge Week 3 + 4: Fund-running for Best Friends Animal Society again!

Guess what? I’ve finally got my charity picked out for the Dopey Challenge! All of you who know me know that I really enjoy fund-running for my big yearly A-races. My charities over the years have varied a bit, but it took some time for me to really hone in on the one that I wanted to focus on this time. The one that I chose for this race is…………..Best Friends Animal Society again.

Amara-Dopey-Fundraiser

I chose this charity again because of all the amazing work that my friend Kaylee does with this organization — she has persevered through so much so that so many lives are saved every day. She has to deal with work trips to tacky Las Vegas, hot days in endless LA traffic, and other travesties (like when people think it’s better to buy pets than adopt them). All that aside, BFAS does some amazing work for other rescues around the country too! They even hooked me up with one of my furever friends, Dexter. When you begin donating to my fundraising campaign, you’ll start getting thank you notes from him! I plan on donating $1 for every training mile I complete during the Dopey Challenge, so I hope you’ll join me for my virtual (or real life!) miles.

Won’t you consider donating a few dollars to their fine organization? Help keep a few kitties and pups off the streets this summer. They’ll be furever thankful that you did!

On another note, I’m really glad that I’m sticking to such a conservative race training plan. If this plan were any more stringent right now, I think I’d already be discouraged.

The Internet has also been out all weekend at home, and this afternoon I cracked open the ultra-running book I was reading through a few years ago. Romancing those thoughts after slogging through a 5.5-mile run seems a bit foolish, but strangely appropriate. It’s funny how even the shortest of runs seem to do that to you. I wonder if the Dopey Challenge counts as an ultra, since it spans over the course of a few days. It doesn’t matter too much, I suppose.

This week, we’ve also sent in our passport renewals, and thus I’ve renewed my efforts in planning out my worldwide, 7-continent marathon tour. We began looking over races to research. Some of them included the Mt. Kilimanjaro Marathon, Victoria Falls Marathon, Rio Marathon, and some other ones. Antarctica is still on my list and its an unwavering desire of mine, so that’ll probably happen soon after the Dopey Challenge. There’s a race in Australia that we were looking at that is a 45km race, so I suppose that qualifies as one! 🙂

So the miles haven’t been too bad over the last few weeks. For week 3, it was 3 runs: 2 45-minute runs, followed by a 3 mile run. What that came out to were three 3.1 mile runs at 45 minutes each for week 3. For this week, it was 3 runs again: 2 45-minute runs, followed by a 5.5 mile run. This week’s work schedule was also similarly intense (although not nearly as bad as last week’s), but I wasn’t able to keep up with my run schedule so I had to cram my runs off-cadence unfortunately. I got them in though.

Today’s 5.5 mile run was a bit difficult since I got up really early (5am or so) but we didn’t get started until 9am. By then I was already really hungry, but generally when I eat I tend to get really sick when I run. So a rungry run it was. The run went well, seeing as though it was a treadmill run. I really would like to get outside sometime. It’d be nice to get out to Sloan Lake to run around a bit, but that requires more logistics. We have some upcoming warm-up races scheduled that I can look forward to 🙂 I really do enjoy running outside, but I guess I ended up being a bit more weary of running along Cherry Creek than I originally thought. And I ended up being a lot more fed up by traffic lights now than I used to be than when I first began running.

072416

I missed last week’s recap post because of work. WORK. Work? Work! All the work. My energy was zapped for most of the week. The meeting schedules got shifted around and with my sleep issues bad enough as it is, I am really struggling to keep up with the new work call time. 8:30am meetings have been wreaking havoc on my body, especially when they necessitate a very early call time, with an even earlier marathon training schedule, with an unwavering launch schedule and teaching schedule. There isn’t a whole lot of flexibility to work with, unfortunately.

I wish there were some sort of nap room at work, or that the weather was nicer so that I could nap in the car midday. Right now it’s a blistering 90-100 degrees out, so I’d probably die (literally) if I were to do that. I’m sure things will slow down here in a bit (maybe?!) so I’ll try to take it a day at a time. I see some of my coworkers heading out for runs during lunch and I wonder how crazy they are, but mostly really how far they are going. I mean, how far can you go during lunch? Maybe the Boulder Creek Trail is shaded enough where it stays somewhat cool? I’ve biked along it and it’s already pretty hot during the mornings. I don’t think I could steal any time during the weekday to do any training runs — that, and Erik and I do all of our weekday training runs together — but maybe it’d be nice to venture out for a head-clearing walk sometimes. But probably when it’s not 100 degrees out. For now I’ll drive down to the local Jamba Juice 🙂

My mantra for the upcoming week:

Go Run

Happy training! Until next time…

== Leave a comment ==

Dopey Challenge Week 2: Planning the Season

Dopey Challenge update: Two weeks down, 27 more to go.

dopey-challenge-copy

Training has been going well. Nothing is off-track yet, although my workload is kicking up into high gear. My stress levels have been negatively affecting my training, but I’ve been aiming to at least get 6-7 hours of sleep in a night. On the nights I achieve that, training isn’t so bad so long that I’m not reading emails in between intervals. It also helps if I’m not ruminating over the amount of work I have on my plate.

I’ve been planning some warm up races for the long road ahead. There are some nice ones in the fall, so I signed up for the Breckenridge Half Marathon in September. It’s at 10,000 feet above sea level. My lungs will probably explode, but luckily there’s a 4-hour time limit.

Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 9.02.00 PM

In December, when the miles pile up, I was able to find a two-day race in Dallas (called the Texas Double) that will allow me to get in my half-marathon and full marathon over the weekend for my training plan. It’ll be nice to run in the outdoors, rather than slogging out 39 miles on a treadmill. I can’t even begin to imagine what that is like.

In addition to those races, I have a few virtual races in progress too. I love races in general, but over the years I’ve found that they are fairly expensive, since I really enjoy the larger races. I’m now saving the big races for a few times a year at most, and I imagine that when I begin taking up triathlons again my pocketbook will suffer once more. Perhaps when I finish paying off my student loans (another 3 years/$110K later, if I follow my financial planner’s schedule), I can celebrate with an Ironman! Or an international race! Or an international Ironman! 😀

So, the Pacific Coast Highway virtual race is about halfway complete. I’m really enjoying the email notifications I get for the landmark mile markers! It’s such a neat little service.

Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 8.45.05 PM

Another challenging race I’ve signed up for is the Amerithon Challenge. I’m using my FitBit to log all of my miles and so far in the first week I’ve logged a little over 25. Not bad!

Amerithon-site-header-1

Milestone200

There’s a few other virtual races I want to sign up for. The Appalachian Trail series looks pretty neat. I’ve always wanted to hike the Appalachian Trail. There’s a schoolteacher in my parents’ town who hikes it regularly, and the local paper always covers it. Regardless, in the absence of being able to do the trail in person, it’s a nice substitute.

Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 8.46.31 PM Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 8.46.38 PM Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 8.46.46 PM

My treadmill doesn’t afford a very nice view, but it allows me to run with my husband, who runs considerably faster than me. I’m currently trying to convince him to train to qualify for the Boston Marathon, but one goal at a time he says. (He’s also training for the Dopey Challenge.)

This is my mantra for the upcoming week:

01166ae2096c581b62beae155a905b0d

Since I try to run first thing in the morning, it can get pretty difficult. I usually want to jump right in to my design work, or grading student assignments. However, I know that by taking care of myself first, I can be the best version of me for everyone who depends on me.

Happy training! Until next time…

== Leave a comment ==

Joy and tragedy

It’s been a busy month so far.

It’s hard to pinpoint the highlight of the month. Graduating was a big deal, but so was getting married. It was great to have a small intimate graduation ceremony — by that I mean having Erik and Alex along with me in Iowa for the first and last time. At the same time, it was great seeing all of my familiar LA and Seattle faces again that I missed so much at my wedding.

13174049_10156883167930504_7450363506882598354_n

wedding-11

Tragedy also struck my family this month. My uncle passed after a few weeks in the hospital due to a number of different ailments. In between graduation and the wedding I flew in to see him, and in between my bachelorette festivities and the rehearsal dinner I went to visit him. I knew he was close to passing, and it was confirmed when the nurse was on the phone telling his sons that they needed to get to the hospital right away since he was not going to make the night. I kissed him goodbye and as I left, I knew it would be the last time I would see him. It was hard to see him hooked up to so many machines, laying there helpless, gasping for air.

IMG_5644

It seems like adult life comes around full circle. You get the good with the bad. The joyous occasions mixed with the tragedies. One is followed by the other, or in this case, it’s simultaneously served. I wouldn’t say it put a damper on all of the festivities but it gave me a lot of perspective. I watched my aunt — someone who had been married for about 25 or so years, someone who loved this man dearly, hang on to the hope that he would get better. She showed up every day to the hospital bright and early, and left each night long after the sun went down. Meanwhile, amidst the chaos, she tried to forecast and balance all of the potential issues and the “what if”s. He had been hospitalized before, but this time, we all knew this was different.

Being there for his final days made me think about how my life and marriage would unfold in its final decades and years. How would I make it count? Do all of these long hours working really matter? What about the foregone opportunities to spend time with friends and family? How many times have I been absent in the presence of others? How many times have I come close to throwing in the towel in my chosen profession because I pushed myself too hard, too fast?

I’ll try to keep things in perspective. There isn’t a whole lot that is important in life outside of a few things: Have fun. Love fiercely. Do good work. Am I missing anything else?

== Leave a comment ==

May 2016 Goals

  1. Continue running 5 days a week:
    • 2 weekday runs should be 45 minutes.
    • All other runs should be 30 minutes.
  2. Incorporate Orangetheory into my workout routine 3 times a week.
  3. Take one complete rest day a week.
  4. Take my vitamins everyday. (This is harder than it sounds!)
  5. Drink 80oz of water each day. (At elevation I heard that I should be drinking 100oz but I have no clue how I’d ever guzzle that much.)
  6. Have fun! (I am graduating and getting married, after all…)
== Leave a comment ==

Slowly warming up

A month or so ago, I downloaded an audiobook on kaizen, the idea of continuous improvement through small incremental steps. I listened to it on the car ride back to the airport from my parents’ house, and have listened to it here and there during my commute to work. One of the key takeaways from kaizen is that in order to take the first step towards any goal, you must break down the goal into the smallest incremental action item possible. It’s akin to flossing one tooth a night when you’re trying to build a flossing habit, or wearing your running gear to bed (like how I used to!) to be dressed and ready to go the next morning.

Since I’ve began listening to that audiobook, I’ve done a lot of thinking about how I could incorporate the concept of kaizen in my training. Oftentimes I give myself monumental goals that seem insurmountable and intimidating. That’s part of the thrill — attempting something that I feel that I mostly can’t do, but somehow might be able to pull off with enough work and determination. These are things like the Ironman (still haven’t checked that one off my list…), and some of my other lofty goals.

The idea of kaizen reminds me a lot of this:

bruce

In an attempt to employ this concept in my life, I bit off the 21-day run streak again that originally got me into the running habit. I was doing really well for a bit, until I managed to get myself sick a week ago and while I’ve been nose-trumpeting, it’s been tough getting my daily run in.

I’m trying not to come down too hard on myself seeing as though I really couldn’t help catching the cold, nor was it the lack of willpower or motivation that kept me from running — it was legitimately because I could not get myself out of bed to run, let alone to the office to work. (I did manage to work from home a lot last week in between some in-town travel, which was nice).

Screen Shot 2016-04-30 at 12.09.55 AM

It’s still a pretty impressive graph to me at least! I’m knocking off the distance a few miles at a time, but it’s been awhile since I’ve really been back on my feet in this way. These small incremental goals have been refreshing. All of this will serve as a warm up for the Dopey Challenge training plan, which is something that I’m trying to get set up on my calendar. 29 weeks of run training! Where will I fit in my HIIT? What about tune-up races? So many questions!

So, in classic Amara fashion, here’s what I’m thinking: warm up races, cross-training, and back to a more regimented training style may be in order. I’m also longing for laps in the pool and have been doing tons of research into which 24 Hour Fitness gyms around me have a clean enough pool to my liking. It’d be great to get in a few short sessions a week. Being in the water has a calming effect on me, at least when it’s just me and the lane markers. I miss my solitary midnight swims, happy hour swims, early morning swims…I guess you can just say that I really miss swimming. Being completely landlocked in Colorado doesn’t really help. However, getting back on a 30-minute swim practice, a couple of times a week, could help me brush up on some pool techniques so that when I’m ready to consider triathlons again, I can be mentally prepared for the water.

With grad school wrapped up, I wonder what is next though. What is my next big thing? I suppose the Dopey Challenge is a pretty big thing, but it still seems like a stepping stone on my way to an Ironman one day. I suppose only time will tell. I’m slowly warming up to the idea of racing again, and I’ll have plenty of things to do on my list until I get into the throes of my season. I am excited to venture down this journey again. It’s about time for a new medal rack anyways.

medalrack

== Leave a comment ==

Race Recap: 2016 Star Wars Kessel Run Challenge

On the heels of a really great product launch I decided to treat myself to the Star Wars Light Side half marathon race entry, only to then be persuaded by the Mr. to sign up for the Dark Side half marathon race a few months later. This was my first Disney coast-to-coast challenge, which was something I never thought I’d get to do. The races were also a few months apart, which was unique in that I went in to the Light Side half with no training whatsoever. I paid the dear, dear price for that during the 2-day car ride home!

Here are some photos from the Light Side half marathon:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

However, in preparation for the Dark Side half, I didn’t get as much training in as I would’ve liked. Never mind an actual 9 or 12-week training plan…I was having enough trouble getting to the gym on a regular basis. If I were to average everything out, I realistically probably got about 2 workouts in a week, which is really sad. However, a week leading up to the race I decided to start a 21-day run streak challenge, which I think ultimately saved my legs from their demise. Epcot was still a blast, and since it was my first time at Disney World, it added to the magic. I don’t know if it was the new shoes, or the humidity, or perhaps the magic of being somewhere new, but I managed to shave 13 minutes off of my time in between races, according to runDisney and RunKeeper. I’ll take it!

Here are some photos from the Dark Side half marathon:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I’m definitely planning on coming back for other Disney races! I saw that they added a weekend in Paris…that’ll have to wait for another year. I’m signing up for the Dopey Challenge for January 2017!

== Leave a comment ==

Race Recap: 2015 Beat the Blerch 10K

This was a really fun run hosted by The Oatmeal himself!

beat_the_blerch

The race was really fun. Along the way there were lots of treats and sights to see. It was a small enough race where you could actually run the whole thing, but big enough where you never actually lost sight of the pack. This was the Mr’s first big marathon. I was very much out of training at the time, so I stuck to a stretch goal distance of 10K. I used it mostly as a litmus test to see how much my HIIT workouts at elevation have been helping me, and after the race I felt great.

The course began/ended at Raley Field, and the 10K course was pretty solid — paved roads or well maintained urban running trails. The marathoners and half-marathoners had some dicey spots like cobblestone and wooden decks but all in all I didn’t hear too many people complain about it.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The most endearing part of the race was seeing the blerches on site handing out treats, like bacon-wrapped dates. There was an aid station with cupcakes. I missed out on a lot of the birthday cake unfortunately.

blerch

The strategic placement of couches were also appreciated by many, but it made me wonder how much work it took for someone to wheel them out around the field and course. Overall, this was a really fun race and I would run another Oatmeal race again. I just saw that there will be a race in Las Vegas in October so I will definitely sign up!

== Leave a comment ==

Reviving the blog

It’s been awhile since I’ve gotten the chance to sit down to reflect about all the change and upheaval in my life over the last year. I finally feel like I’m a point where I’ve settled in to my new city, Denver. I am wrapping up my final WEEK of grad school. Work is all over the place but when isn’t it? Life is moving pretty quickly and I’m getting married in a few weeks, and I’m pretty excited about that.

There has been an intense sense of irony in my move to Denver in that this has been the least active I’ve ever been. I was really excited to move to Denver because I thought I’d get out (as in, outside into the wilderness!) a lot more often, and I’d be able to focus a lot more on my training. That hasn’t quite been the case since I’ve moved here. The first month or so I was able to get quite a bit of time in, mostly because I was here a month before I was set to begin working and before Mr. was permanently moved in. I spent that month detoxing from prior work stress, only to slide in to another rinse-repeat cycle. It has since been compounded and relieved a few times over, mostly due to the ebb and flow of my work and the types of opportunities come my way. I’m trying my best not to overcommit but it is easier said than done.

That said, I am really looking forward to striking a better balance between all of my competing priorities. When grad school took over the scene, a lot of my training time disappeared. How, with grad school practically out of the picture, that should open up a little more time for training. The amount of training I’ll be able to do will depend on how much teaching work I’m taking on outside of my normal 9-5 (if you can call it that). I think that this is the typical story of the average adult though — we all have aspirations, and we’re all overextended. No part of this struggle makes me particularly special. However, in articulating this, I hope to find some sort of clarity in how I’ve structured my time and how I will go about my training in the future. I’ve failed miserably at having a regimented schedule, and I’ve also failed when having nothing on the calendar too. What’s seemed to have worked in the past is a mix of having a goal, having a semblance of a plan, and having some wiggle room along the way for training augmentation, rewards, rest, and the like.

What I’ve found to be the biggest barrier to my training over the last two years since I’ve been in grad school, and while exiting my position in Seattle, and while launching my first product at my current job and now working on the second launch, is that the cognitive stress from my work really does take a physical toll on my body and my energy level. I’ve spent countless weekends trying to recover from them. It feels very similar to having raced without the proper amount of training. I have the mental strength to pull myself through those prolonged periods of stress but it’s in no way healthy to continue to do so.

There are a few changes that I am making…

For one, I’ve switched out the domain — from Ironwoman in Training to Amara in Training. I’m not quite sure if I’ve completely shelved the idea of completing an Ironman. At the moment it’s hard to fathom being able to find the time to commit to that kind of training again. I don’t necessarily feel that my window has passed, but perhaps my motivation has. Maybe it’ll one day return. Nonetheless, the domain address didn’t seem as fitting anymore, so I switched it out to something that was a little more enduring. It seems as though I will always be in training, so this one seemed to have fit the bill.

Second, I’m on day 13 of a 21-day run streak. (I had to take one day off this weekend because I was at the height of my cold, unfortunately.) My goal has been to get at least 30 minutes of running in a day. I’ve identified a lot of false obstacles in my way, one in particular being a HIIT gym schedule that I try to adhere to. When I haven’t been able to make my classes, I tended to write off that day completely. Now, I’ve been prioritizing my runs and I haven’t been trying to schedule any days at the gym. (A part of me is still torn about whether or not to keep the membership, but that’s another discussion completely.)

Third, I’m trying to be somewhat more conservative with my race calendar. I’ve historically registered for lots of races up front, only not to make it to the start line for a myriad of reasons. By being a little more methodical up front, I think I can probably save myself a lot of money and a lot of disappointment. I’ve committed to a fairly large goal in early 2017 — the Disney’s Dopey Challenge — so there will be plenty of warm-up races and training pains to discuss!

== Leave a comment ==

When the unthinkable happens

For most of my adult life, I’ve lived with the motto memento mori etched at the back of my head where it meets my neck. I traced the letters from Andy Warhol’s various illustrations — someone who was rebellious and poked fun at conventional living. The placement of my tattoo is particularly symbolic in that this idea is something that I keep in the back of my mind every day.

Memento mori and Andy Warhol come together in an interesting way. Memento mori is a statement that literally translates to “remember that you have to die,” which is a phrase that helps one reflect on personal mortality and what it means in regards to vanity, earthly life, and the transient nature of the people and things that surround us. One of my favorite quotes by Andy Warhol is, “Sometimes the little times you don’t think are anything while they’re happening turn out to be what marks a whole period of your life.” These two elements came together in a natural way for me, and as the idea hit me, I ditched class to work on the design of the tattoo during the daytime and had it etched into my skin later that evening.

On Saturday, one of my esteemed colleagues lost his life on a major Seattle freeway to a young 20 year old man who decided that his phone was more important than anyone else’s safety or life. Granted, maybe he was getting a very important message or call, or perhaps he had just learned some very bad news and was distracted. It is worthless to speculate the what-could-have-beens, but regardless of that young man’s circumstances, he should’ve prioritized life over whatever communications were coming his way.

Screen-Shot-2015-08-11-at-8.22.33-AM

As a human being in general, we have a certain amount of responsibilities to ourselves and other people to not put them in harms way. I give this young man the benefit of the doubt that whatever he was distracted by was important enough to him that he needed to take his eyes off the road. Given the outcome, I hope that he would’ve done things differently.

Not a lot of good can come from someone’s death in such a tragic way. However, I hope this lesson reverberates with this particular young man, his family, and his extended circle of friends. I hope that this is a lesson that others will learn from, so that my friend’s death was not in vain.

With regards to Sohel Ahuja, I met him in 2012 when I first considered moving to Seattle to work at Amazon. During my interview, he grilled me on how I would work on improving the team’s current product suite. When I was eventually hired, Sohel helped me feel at home, often swinging by my desk to reminisce about In-N-Out and the now-defunct Chano’s Mexican Food joint right outside of USC. Over happy hour, he oftentimes recounted the story of how he and his wife met. I’ve probably heard that story a dozen times. Every time he told that story, it was as if he was falling in love with her all over again. He also had a penchant for appletinis (of which the team relentlessly made fun of him) and whirlyball (something that became an annual team tradition).

11855773_10155917484870504_8068185959508979602_n

11822313_10155916579725504_1728224549272121051_n

On a small design project, he and I tag-teamed on a few different tasks as our other engineers were busy launching another product. He was earnestly learning from our senior managers what it meant to truly lead a team. Learning as you go, you make a lot of mistakes, but then again, who’s perfect anyways? His efforts did not go unnoticed because no matter what he worked on, he never half-assed anything. Even if he weren’t 100% perfect at what he did, he gave 100% of himself to it. That was the Sohel I knew first-hand.

In early 2014, I had made the difficult decision to transition to another team at Amazon. Sohel took some time out of his insane work schedule to write out an 8-point bullet list that outlined all the reasons why I should stay. The first four were about my career as a designer and how I was a valued person on my team. The last four were, “5. The team really likes you. 6. Steve really likes you. 7. Katie really likes you. 8. I really like you.” I still ended up transferring out but would run into him every once in awhile around South Lake Union. We would quickly exchange pleasantries but dash off to another meeting. Such is life at Amazon.

Sohel played a supporting role during a huge phase of my life. He and I didn’t always see eye-to-eye on things, and eventually my focus (and reporting structure) was moved over to other people and projects. However, it is was the little ways in which he participated during this phase of my life that stays with me. He left us in the most tragic of ways, but I’ll try to remember the ways in which he genuinely tried to make someone feel like a part of the family.

== Leave a comment ==

My time in Seattle has come to an end…for now

I came to Seattle a few years ago, completely burnt out on the idea of being a designer.

pugetsound

In fact, when Amazon recruited me, I was freelancing to make ends meet but was saving up to go to med school. I got the call to come in for an interview, and eventually got an offer, and so I took it. I figured that this was going to be my one last shot I would give design, as a profession, before I swore it off completely. I rationalized with myself that I could always quit if I still found it awful or boring. I didn’t know a soul, and I figured that it was half of the fun of coming to a new city. I flew in the night before I was slated to start my job, overslept, and nearly missed my new hire orientation the next day. I think I drove to the office that morning and forgot what parking lot I had parked in, and spent the better part of that evening checking all of the underground parking lots in South Lake Union.

After my first week in Seattle, I knew that I had finally found somewhere that I belonged. Over the course of the next few years, I learned a lot about myself and what it meant to me to be a designer. Each quarter, as I reviewed my professional goals at work, I always made it a point to list out a few personal goals for my own edification. They included things like, “move on from the boyfriend who doesn’t treat me the way I deserve,” “go back to grad school and finish the damn degree,” “solve real problems,” etc.

goals

I’ve spent the better part of three years in Seattle deconstructing my identity and rebuilding it in the image of the person that I thought I’d grow up to be: someone who would put others above herself, someone who would give back more than she took, and someone who prioritized people over artificial/created problems. I can say with a clear conscience that I unabashedly gave myself to my work, my craft, and my tribe.

CEEyIZBVIAAF0a5

A lot of people have asked me about what my greatest accomplishment was during my time here. I had launched quite a few products and helped on projects across a lot of different teams. It’s easy to define yourself by the traditional markers of success — what you launched, how much you made, etc — but for me, success is a little different. What I consider my biggest successes are the three people I helped mentor in to new roles and positions. Of all the projects I worked on across all of the different parts of the company, I found that helping these three specific people achieve their goals was singlehandedly the most important thing I could’ve ever done over these past three years.

I leave Seattle knowing that I’ve done my best, in all aspects. I left no stone unturned. I’m looking forward to coming back to what I’ve already dubbed as my forever-home in the near future. Until then…

mountains

 

Looking forward to what’s next!

== Leave a comment ==